Friday, February 7, 2020

Explanatory synthesis Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Explanatory synthesis - Essay Example Social psychology challenges the most basic assumptions of human behaviour and nature, and to a big extent the predictability of the social world. Psychologists look at the different kinds of situations in the world in a very distinct and different way from that of other people and they apply the beliefs and insights of psychology to the unfolding social events around them. Individuals respond differently to social influences by either choosing to comply, identifying, complying or internalizing. Compliance is seen as a form of agreement to the particular situation at hand, but deep from within the person might be in no way convinced. Situations in a big way determine the kind response a person will extend to particular situation. In the text, Ross argues that the type of information about personality that most of the people would possess before predicting personality proves to be of relatively little value. Research has indicated that when faced in certain situations such as these, i t is not possible to predict with accuracy how particular people will respond. Situational behaviour in relation to an individual’s actions can be demonstrated in the parable of the Good Samaritan. The story is about a Jewish man who was travelling to Jericho, but bandits attacked him and left him lying half-dead by the roadside. A priest passes him and offers him no help, until a Good Samaritan whose stereotype hated the Jews stopped by and offered the man assistance. The study experimenters of social philosophy recruited 67 students from the Princeton Theological Seminary, telling them that it a study about religious education and vocations (Hoyk, Hersey 49). Unknown to these participants, they were to be subjected to their own personal Good Samaritan attributes. The requirement was that they would fill questionnaires on their personality then walk to a nearby room to give their talk. On the doorway, a man was lying doubled over with his eyes closed and coughing. All the pa rticipants would not escape the site of the distressed man and the biggest question was, would they be willing to offer any assistance to the man? In their assumption, the experimenters thought that it would be dependent on how much the participants were hurried, and thus devised a way of manipulating them, by giving each a map and one of the instructions which either stated that the participant was late and had been a few minutes late. Another stated that the assistance was waiting for the participant, yet the other stated that it would take another few minutes before the interviewers were ready, but had the option of proceeding over. This created conditions of high, medium, and low hurry and thus some students left the office thinking that they needed to be quick, others less while the rest felt relaxed. Each of the three conditions were was also divided into two, half of them were required to give a talk on the Good Samaritan and the other half on prospects for seminary graduates . This helped the experimenters to assess both the effects of hurry and the talk they were to give on students’ helping behaviours. The outcome of the experience was classified into two classes, which included in a hurry and could not stop and judge on context. From the results, only 40% of the students offered some form of assistance to the people, with a few stepping over the apparently injured man, but it was evident that the amount of hurry they were in had a

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Airport Incident Management System Essay Example for Free

Airport Incident Management System Essay 1. Introduction Airport operations are growing in complexity day by day, and extend across multiple service providers at the airport – namely ground handlers, customs, immigration, retail tenants, air traffic control, security, baggage handlers, airlines consortiums and airlines. These agencies use the airport infrastructure in such a way that they meet their commitment to their customers in due time. These commitments put a lot of pressure on the airport infrastructure support staff to keep the systems up and running efficiently. Currently these services are handled manually at most of the Indian airports, so there are umpteen chances of these services to breakdown at most appropriate time when airport are supposed to meet their stated commitments with agencies. These incidents are very frequently occurring, particularly at the busy airports like Delhi and Hyderabad where pressure to meet timelines are heavy on airport infrastructure. Therefore there is a need for a technology solution to provide the flexible and proactive service delivery which guarantees the availability and usability of the infrastructure available at the airport to meet the commitments. This case study discusses a solution that raises the service level of the airport to its agencies and eventually creates a positive image in the minds of its users. This case study is based on this technical solution provided at one of the busy airport where the technical solution created, provides the right answer to different stakeholders at the airport. The context diagram [pic] Source Internet 2. Case Study Purpose The purpose of this case study is to highlight the technical solution provided to solve the problems arising due to the multiple agencies of the airport using the same airport infrastructure. 3. Case Study Methodology The methodology to arrive at the solution to the use of airport infrastructure problem was the extensive survey method and later on the software implementation methodology for implementing AR Systems (Incident Management Components). The Survey Method A questionnaire about the status of services provided by the current staff to the concerned agency department was circulated and feedback collected. The response feedback was consolidated and improvements discussed and applied. A need to streamlining the procedure or writing the standard procedure was felt and implemented in the short run. Visits by senior management staff to similar airport and studying the response to the tender floated by the airport led to the long term planning of implementing the software solution. 4. The technology strategy After the gruesome struggle to provide the required service 247 at the airport terminal building, a search for better technical solution that can cater to the current requirement and as well as give scope for future growth is always on. A team of experts were constituted to suggest the course of action which can address the airports infrastructure problem in the short run and simultaneously can find appropriate technology solutions to mitigate the problem as well as expand the extent of service at the airport for future projections. Short Term Planning – It was felt that in short run the airport operation must have the standard procedure which can be followed and improved with the experience of supporting the agencies of the airport. The performance of the support staff can also be measured and their skill enhanced to meet requirements of different support levels. Long term Planning – An appropriate IT solution must be developed or procured to record incidents / solutions and can use the learning/Knowledge for handling future incidents.

Monday, January 20, 2020

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in E-Commerce Essay -- Trade Ec

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in E-Commerce The US is seeking to extend the duty-free status of international online transactions to protect the development of global electronic commerce, the Clinton administration said yesterday. Susan Esserman, deputy US trade representative, said the US wanted the World Trade Organization to agree "at the earliest possible date" to extend the current moratorium on customs duties for electronic trade. In testimony to the Senate foreign relations sub-committee on Europe, Ms Esserman said duty-free cyberspace was particularly valuable to US software companies that were seeking to distribute their products electronically. The US is also looking for WTO members to affirm that electronic commerce is subject to existing rules and agreements, and should not face "unnecessary regulatory barriers to trade". However Ms Esserman said "more time and work are necessary" before electronic goods could be subject to final classification under WTO rules. Electronic commerce in the US is forecast to grow to $1,300bn by 2003, while in India it is expected to grow by $15bn within two years. Richard Wolffe, Washington Protectionism, it seems, is always with us and it is useful to examine the intermittent attempts made to establish rules for its containment. This book is one such examination, on the conception, birth, and early years of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT); it is restricted to the years 1940--53. It is the work of an historian but one at the political, rather than economic, end of the spectrum. The heavy emphasis throughout is on the American role within an essentially Anglo-American tussle. The argument is that although trade was a relatively small proportion of US output it was used for political and diplomatic purposes. The general thrust is that the US was keen on a new liberal order and determined to break the British empire's preferential trading arrangements. However, when we read that the central argument is that, 'by liberalizing trade while protecting domestic economies -- a bargain consistent with US trade law, practice, and history ...', we might reasonably expect to be in for a roc ky ride. Politics is important and possibly even central in the process of trade protection, but will always be found to depend on economic forces. The politics... ...sn’t have enough of its own trees to meet its demand for paper. The cheapest way for the Japanese to meet their paper needs has been to import raw logs from America, a trade which ended in the 1980s because there simply was not enough timber to supply Japan and satisfy domestic U.S. needs. Free trade, of course, demands that traders sell to the customer who offers the highest price; they cannot be required to fill the needs of one market at the expense of another. Should Americans sell to Japan at higher prices even if it means domestic shortages, or is it appropriate to say, "These are our trees, hands off"? The arguments that apply to protecting timber can also be easily applied to other natural resources, such as coal or copper. On the other hand, free trade agreements work to the benefit of the United States in terms of resources where we cannot fill our own needs, such as oil or gold. Although each of these arenas has its own specific issues, in each case the essential question boils down to: "Is this important enough to our country that we should protect ourselves against the inroads of foreign traders, thereby cutting ourselves off from the benefits of free trade?" General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in E-Commerce Essay -- Trade Ec General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in E-Commerce The US is seeking to extend the duty-free status of international online transactions to protect the development of global electronic commerce, the Clinton administration said yesterday. Susan Esserman, deputy US trade representative, said the US wanted the World Trade Organization to agree "at the earliest possible date" to extend the current moratorium on customs duties for electronic trade. In testimony to the Senate foreign relations sub-committee on Europe, Ms Esserman said duty-free cyberspace was particularly valuable to US software companies that were seeking to distribute their products electronically. The US is also looking for WTO members to affirm that electronic commerce is subject to existing rules and agreements, and should not face "unnecessary regulatory barriers to trade". However Ms Esserman said "more time and work are necessary" before electronic goods could be subject to final classification under WTO rules. Electronic commerce in the US is forecast to grow to $1,300bn by 2003, while in India it is expected to grow by $15bn within two years. Richard Wolffe, Washington Protectionism, it seems, is always with us and it is useful to examine the intermittent attempts made to establish rules for its containment. This book is one such examination, on the conception, birth, and early years of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT); it is restricted to the years 1940--53. It is the work of an historian but one at the political, rather than economic, end of the spectrum. The heavy emphasis throughout is on the American role within an essentially Anglo-American tussle. The argument is that although trade was a relatively small proportion of US output it was used for political and diplomatic purposes. The general thrust is that the US was keen on a new liberal order and determined to break the British empire's preferential trading arrangements. However, when we read that the central argument is that, 'by liberalizing trade while protecting domestic economies -- a bargain consistent with US trade law, practice, and history ...', we might reasonably expect to be in for a roc ky ride. Politics is important and possibly even central in the process of trade protection, but will always be found to depend on economic forces. The politics... ...sn’t have enough of its own trees to meet its demand for paper. The cheapest way for the Japanese to meet their paper needs has been to import raw logs from America, a trade which ended in the 1980s because there simply was not enough timber to supply Japan and satisfy domestic U.S. needs. Free trade, of course, demands that traders sell to the customer who offers the highest price; they cannot be required to fill the needs of one market at the expense of another. Should Americans sell to Japan at higher prices even if it means domestic shortages, or is it appropriate to say, "These are our trees, hands off"? The arguments that apply to protecting timber can also be easily applied to other natural resources, such as coal or copper. On the other hand, free trade agreements work to the benefit of the United States in terms of resources where we cannot fill our own needs, such as oil or gold. Although each of these arenas has its own specific issues, in each case the essential question boils down to: "Is this important enough to our country that we should protect ourselves against the inroads of foreign traders, thereby cutting ourselves off from the benefits of free trade?"

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Gonzales V. Raich

Pace University Michael Khoo LAW 101 Gonzales v. Raich(545 U. S. 1 (U. S. Sup. Ct. 2005)) I. FACTS Angel Raich and Diane Monson (plaintiffs) suffered from serious medical conditions and the only effective treatment was the use of Marijuana which was recommended by the doctors. In 1996, a California statue, under the name of The Compassionate Use Act, was established to legally allow marijuana to be used only for medicinal purposes. Monson cultivated her own Marijuana for her own usage as she relied on it heavily for daily functions.The Drug Enforcement Administration (defendant) came to Monson’s house, discovered the cannabis plants and destroyed all six of them. Raich and Monson sued the DEA to obtain an injunction that would inhibit the enforcement of the federal Control Substance Act (CSA) on Monson. The CSA classifies marijuana as a controlled substance. Raich and Monson claimed that enforcing the CSA would violate the Commerce Clause and the Due Process Clause of the Fift h Amendment. II. JUDGEMENT Angel Raich and Diane Monson (plaintiffs) won the case.The Drug Enforcement Administration (defendant) lost the case. III. LEGAL PRINCIPAL A. ISSUE Whether Congress’ power to regulate interstate markets for medical substances encompasses the portions of those markets that are supplied with drugs produced and consumed locally. B. HOLDING No. IV. REASONING A. GENERAL ANALYSIS In this Constitutional Case, the Controlled Substance Act (CSA) gives Congress and the Federal government the right to confiscate and/ or destroy any discovered controlled substances.Marijuana is considered a schedule 1 controlled substance due to hazards, high potential for abuse and lack of medicinal benefits. The Compassionate Use Act was created in 1996 in California as a statue that legally allows Marijuana to be used only for medicinal and medical purposes. The argument used against the DEA for enforcing the CSA on the plaintiffs is that it would be a violation of the Comme rce Clause which is a major component of the Fifth Amendment.The Commerce Clause establishes that the congress has the authority to oversee, regulate and intervene in interstate commercial activity. B. APPLIED ANALYSIS The Controlled Substance Act’s jurisdiction was used by the DEA to destroy Marijuana in Monson’s house because of the simple fact that Marijuana is categorized as a Schedule 1 controlled substance. However the plaintiffs argue that such action would take away the power of the Commerce Clause of the Fifth Amendment which states that the federal government body has the authority to overlook and regulate interstate activity.Nowhere in that clause does it give the federal body the power to regulate intrastate activity which is the case of the cultivation of marijuana in Monson’s house. In addition to that, the Compassionate Use Act supports the cultivation of marijuana in Monson’s house because Monson is a patient who was severely ill and whose life was dependent on the usage of Marijuana for recovery. According to the circumstances of this case in which the possession of marijuana was due to health, medical and medicinal reason, and for abuse purposes, the Supreme Court has overruled the DEA to execute the CSA on Monson.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Police Operations - 780 Words

Police Operations Paper Jessica Eley Todd Larson CJA/214 9/6/11 In the early 1900 policing made up of two basic functions patrolling and investigating crimes. Patrol officers patrolled the areas mainly on foot requiring direct contact with the community they served. The detectives investigated illegal gambling operations and corruption. Looking into modern policing dangers in the job is a primary concern and how to improve measures for the safety of the officers. The Taser is a less than lethal weapon used to stop individuals without fatally wounding them. The use of modern technology in today’s policing has become widespread in securing Americas borders and every day policing duties. In policing there are applications†¦show more content†¦Police workers experience various tasks, interpersonal and physical demands during police operations that the majority of ordinary people never come across at their work or in their families. These requirements and stressors negatively influence a physical and psychological condition that ma y lead to more serious physical or mental damage or interruption role and physical demands for policemen can develop a condition of constant overload called hyper stress. Typically, the number of queries concerns and emergency calls exceeds the time assigned to a particular police worker. Therefore, not only is the quality of the time given to each separate case and that’s why each case at risk, the mental and physical condition of the police worker is in jeopardy. Regarding investigators, they experience heavy caseloads for which they are expected to follow prescribed case management criteria. Also, they find themselves within very limited time framework set by prosecutors who may keep them under the pressure to finish the process as fast as they possibly can, so that the case can reach the trial. Insomnia or permanent tiredness is often caused by hyper stress, as well as weight loss /gain and different degrees of impairment of mental processes. On the contrary, hypo stress may emerge from input under loads for police workers who work a 3rd shift and accept few or calls during nightShow MoreRelatedPolice Operations Paper1143 Words   |  5 PagesPolice Operations LAS CJA/214 September 03, 2010 Arnold Wicker Abstract In the early 1900 policing made up of two basic functions patrolling and investigating crimes. Patrol officers patrolled the areas mainly on foot requiring direct contact with the community they served. The detectives investigated illegal gambling operations and corruption. Looking into modern policing dangers in the jobRead MoreUnethical Police Operations1835 Words   |  8 PagesUnethical Police Operations Paper Kareem Dorsey CJA 214 January 10, 2013 Scott McMillion . Police officer asking for sexual favors while on duty is a misuse of power and displays corruption and a bad representation of ethics for the police department. English heritage played in an integral part in modern American policing. Corruption has been a problem in most police departments everywhere. The problem has been corrected within most departments but is still a major problem. BrutalityRead MorePolice Operation : Patrol And Detective1450 Words   |  6 PagesPolice Operation: Patrol and Detective It may seem impossible to sum up the daily job description for a police officer. Police officers have to wear many hats during a career. From conducting traffic stops to making a death notification to a next of kin, the job of a police officer comes with many challenges. There is no such thing as routine patrol in law enforcement. Each day an officer may face a new challenge they have not faced before and how they respond and react may be a matter of lifeRead MoreThe Success And Failures Of The Modern Police Operations1260 Words   |  6 Pagesin order to grow and improve. The Modern Police Operations is not excluded from that process. In this body of work, the history of law enforcement operations as well as the key law enforcement agencies that are responsible for enforcing law, the explanation of one major change to law enforcement operations and the reason why the change was necessary, the opinion of the author in regards to whether or not the change was an improvement to po lice operations and lastly, discussing the main requirementsRead MoreThe Commander Of The Operations Division Of A Police Department886 Words   |  4 Pages As the commander of the operations division of a police department, I would have a responsibility to the officers in my command, to take their concerns, regarding job related stress, very seriously. Law enforcement is one of the most stressful jobs in our country, and job related stress has detrimental effects on the officers (Bohm, 2010) We, as a society, and more specifically, as police supervisors, are asking these officers to go face dangers and traumatic, life threatening, life alteringRead MoreExcessive Force And Unethical Police Operations2351 Words   |  10 PagesISSUE: Excessive Force and Unethical Police Operations RULE: First precept of Natural Law: â€Å"That good is to be done and pursued, and evil is to be avoided† ANALYSIS: Over the last decade a mounting problem has begun to emerge involving public safety across the United States. The arrival of new technology is effectively exposing a problem within our police forces that in the past was overlooked and labeled insignificant or as isolated cases. Currently public safety forces across the nation are rapidlyRead MoreEssay about Unethical Police Operations959 Words   |  4 PagesThe actions of police are watched very closely. To the public, they are seen as those who protect and preserve the peace. However, there have been many situations in which victims have had to testify against a police officer because of some type of misconduct. When this happens, it takes a serious toll on the entire community. Trust becomes ruined, and in most cases the victim is left with a mental scar. Police officers have ethics that they are expected to follow. In the cases where they do notRead MoreUnethical Police Operations1099 Words   |  5 PagesUnethical Police Oper ations When a Police Officer abuses his authority, it is called police misconduct. Police misconduct is a broad term used to describe police corruption and police brutality which include violations of state and federal laws, the violation of an individual’s constitutional rights, the abuse of police authority for personal gain, excessive force, false arrest and imprisonment, malicious prosecution, and wrongful death. Police misconduct can often lead to the miscarriage of justiceRead MorePolice Operations: Theory and Practice1707 Words   |  7 PagesTHIS IS PLAGIARISM, AND FACILITATORS DO HAVE THE ABILITY TO CHECK PAPERS AGAINST OTHER STUDENTS SUBMISSIONS. I HOPE THIS HELPS...! Police Operations Name CJA/214 Month dd, 2011 Facilitators Name Police Operations In the United States, policing agencies at all levels participate in various activities and operations. Responsibility, naming, function, authority, and jurisdictions vary at local, state, and federal levels of law enforcement. Although thereRead MoreUsb Stick Seized During The Police Arrest Operation3373 Words   |  14 PagesSecurity Goals 2 Threats 2 Vulnerabilities 3 Attacks 3 Tools And Techniques Used To Recover Passwords 4 Outline 6 Conclusion 7 References 7 Introduction This is a report on my findings of the USB stick seized during the police arrest operation. Starting with a security analysis of the USB stick by defining the security goals that are trying to be achieved, the report then focuses on the tools and techniques used to recover passwords. Finally a detailed outline will be given on the

Friday, December 27, 2019

Greek Theatre And Medieval Drama - 1587 Words

Greek Theatre and Medieval Drama: Distant Siblings Greek theatre and medieval drama were both very popular artistic events in their own periods of performance. However, from ancient Greece to the renaissance, time has set them apart in terms of methodology; their practitioners use a creative process based off of different mindsets. Therefore, the significant time lapse between the two genres has had an evident impact on the way theatre was perceived and presented. In comparing aspects such as religious motivations, conditions of violence and character development, the distinct theatrical natures of Greek theatre and medieval drama will be made apparent. Though both genres of theatre are closely tied to religion, Greek theatre and medieval drama have different religious motivations that impact the ways in which the theatrical event is utilized. In Greece, theatre was used to entertain or please the Gods, more specifically the God Dionysus, during the most important of the four Atheni an festivals: the Great Dionysia. The first known Greek playwrights, such as Thespis and Euripides, were chosen to compete in the festival and submit three tragedies and one satyr play to be performed in front of approximately 15,000 spectators. In classical Greece, theatre was the center of citizenship and society; religious ideologies towards Dionysus were not only realized by performances, but strongly encouraged by the state. For example, if a citizen could not afford to attend theShow MoreRelatedRoles And Roles Of William Shakespeare s The Revival Of Theatre Medieval Western Europe 1337 Words   |  6 Pages7. With specific reference to ONE or MORE of the Quem Quaeritis tropes, discuss the role played by the Church in the revival of theatre in Medieval Western Europe. The relationship between Christianity and theatre was always a complicated one, however, it was the Church that played a vital role in the revival of theatre in Medieval Western Europe. After a drought of theatrical performance, the Church slowly evolved from presenting liturgical readings to dramatic tropes. Quem Quaeritis tropes wereRead MoreEvolution of Opera: Greek Drama to Baroque Opera Essays870 Words   |  4 PagesDonald Grout defines opera in his text, A Short History of Opera, as â€Å"a drama in music: a dramatic action, exhibited on stage with scenery by actors in costume, the words conveyed entirely or for the most part by singing, and the whole sustained and amplified by orchestral music† (4). A literal translation of the word opera is simply work, and although the term opera was not coined until 1634, one of the first known operas was performed in 1597 (Grout 1). Grout explains that there are two types ofRead MoreCharacteristics of Drama1660 Words   |  7 Pa gesHistory of Drama Ancient Drama The origins of Western drama can be traced to the celebratory music of 6th-century BC Attica, the Greek region centered on Athens. Although accounts of this period are inadequate, it appears that the poet Thespis developed a new musical form in which he impersonated a single character and engaged a chorus of singer-dancers in dialogue. As the first composer and soloist in this new form, which came to be known as tragedy, Thespis can be considered both the first dramatistRead MoreHistory of Theatre Lesson Notes Essay5401 Words   |  22 Pagesï » ¿Lesson 1: Origins of Theatre Learning objectives: List the performance elements and understand their role in both ritual and theatre: time, place, participants (players, audience), scenario (agenda/goal/text/rules), clothing (uniform, costume, mask, makeup), sound (speech, music), movement (gesture, pantomime, dance), and function or purpose. Can be clock or fictional time, places vary (designed to meet needs), rituals might take place in one space or they might involve a procession with portionsRead MoreThe Renaissance : The Ideas Of The English Renaissance972 Words   |  4 PagesThe English Renaissance transformed the written word into a respected art form through drama and poetry. The works of people like Thomas More, Edmund Spencer, Christopher Marlowe, and William Shakespeare helped to spread the ideas of the Renaissance to a majority of the people. Ideas such as romantic love, humanism and secularism became widely discussed and allowed the common man and the rich man to ponder on similar ideas. Unlike the Italian Renaissanc e, where noble patrons would hire artists toRead MoreThe Xvii Century : A Political Point Of View909 Words   |  4 Pages The XVII Century, on a political point of view, was the time where France was pressured under the reign of Richelieu firstly and then under Louis XIV s and saw its great liberties dying one after the other, liberties France had since medieval times. Especially under Louis XIV s reign where he coined the famous sentence The King is me, The State is me. Tired by all the religious, political, literary earthquakes, the people were waiting patiently (not only the poor part of the population but alsoRead MoreThe Long And Cold Effects The Middle Ages965 Words   |  4 Pagesthe descendants of the great, now fallen, Roman Empire. They thought that they should keep the legacy of the romans alive and continuous. Scholars found old Greek dramas and brought them to Italy where they would get into theatre production. People wanted to understand the works of the past; the p lays of the classical era such as Greek dramas and Aristotle. This idea then spread all over Europe. Niccolà ² di Bernardo dei Machiavelli was not only a writer but diplomat who is best know for writing TheRead MoreHow People Process And Document The Human Experience1196 Words   |  5 Pagesorigins of theater. What we do know comes in the forms of wall paintings, artifacts, and hieroglyphics. They show the stories of successful hunts, the changing of the seasons. They also tell the stories of getting old and the stories of the Gods. Theatre came from the myths of the Gods as well as rituals and ceremonies. Think of any old western movie you have seen where the Indians are chanting and dancing around a fire in costumes and masks, or the Mayans doing blood sacrifices or bloodletting toRead MoreAnalysis Of Neil Fraser s The Golden Age 1893 Words   |  8 PagesTheatre History Explained Neil Fraser outlines the history of theatre from Greek and Roman times, all the way through the twentieth century. Fraser makes a claim that theatre truly began in Greek culture with even the Roma’s looking upon that time as â€Å"the golden age†. â€Å"The Romans looked back on Greek theatre of circa 600BC as a golden age, and we can still make a case for the great plays of that period as having never been bettered.† (Fraser, 2004, pg.5). Some of the more important highlights ofRead MoreDeath Of A Salesman By Arthur Miller1660 Words   |  7 PagesWhat is the correct definition of tragedy anyways? Many people would define tragedy as a disaster, but according to the book The Cambridge Guide to World Theatre by Martin Banham, the word tragedy is â€Å"a word whose meaning changes with time and place† (1002). In Medieval times, â€Å"tragedy came to mean the downfall of a person of high degree† (Banham 1002), but in recent times, the meaning of the word tragedy has many definitions. According to Banham, â€Å"realists refused to limit tragedy to privileged

Thursday, December 19, 2019

My Personal Philosophy of Education Essay - 1486 Words

Philosophy of Education My philosophy of education is almost wholly derived from my own experiences as a student. I have always had a love of learning, but have not exactly felt the same way about school, in part because I was bored with the classes and material. My teaching methods and views of learning reflect the idea I have of how I would have liked my teachers to teach. Major philosophical approaches: My interest in teaching stems from my belief that teachers can have an incredible amount of influence over the life of their students, and with this privilege comes a great deal of responsibility to the student. Knowing this, it seems like a no-brainer to me that a teacher, just because of the†¦show more content†¦Of course, they also serve a practical purpose, which I believe is important. Therefore, in addition to having existentialist notions, I give equal credence to progressivism. My progressivist perspective stems from my belief that the purpose of public education is to help people learn to think critically, to be able to teach themselves new things. Although I am aware that education is the path to a job, I do not advocate using that as a motivation to students—mainly because I know that this is not effective, probably because young children and most teenagers do not have any idea what life is like after high school (which is why I believe that every 16-year-old should be required to work in a fast food restaurant for at least 6 months). Another reason I think this type of extrinsic motivation is ineffective is that it does not make the material being taught any more interesting to the student, so it may be irrelevant that the individual wants to learn because he or she still finds it difficult to pay attention and truly comprehend the material because of lack of interest in it. A good teacher should be intent on sparking students’ interest in every subject. As a teacher, I hope to achieve this by showing enthusiasm for each subject, being creative and innovative with lessons, and relating material to real-world situations instead of teaching concepts without illustrating why they are important to know. I like the progressivist idea that the role of theShow MoreRelatedMy Personal Philosophy : My Philosophy Of Education1046 Words   |  5 Pagesmanipulate the information for their own use in the future. Choosing between the four, I would say my philosophical views line up more as an essentialist. My philosophy of education, is that every teacher and student has an environment where they are challenged, yet still encouraged, in their instructional matter and teaching and learning strategies to prepare them to meet the goals set upon them. A philosophy is a search for wisdom in a particular area; it builds a framework of thinking, and guides instructionalRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy Of Education997 Words   |  4 Pages Philosophy of Education Discovering the place where personal values and expertise meet organizational values and needs offers a dynamic partnership opportunity. Mutual achievement of organizational academic quality and professional fulfillment provides a positive learning environment. Developing a personal philosophy of education enables an educator to understand and communicate the underlying basis for his or her approach to education. Sharing this philosophy provides valuable information forRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy Of Education1476 Words   |  6 Pages871 Foundations of Higher Education Summer 2015 Instructor: Joel Abaya, PhD Personal Philosophy of Education Submitted by: Wessam Elamawy . Personal Philosophy of Education Introduction: From the very beginning of my life I recognized the importance of higher education. I am 34 years old. I am Egyptian. I was born in a highly educated family . My father earned a Ph.D. in chemistry. My uncle earned a Ph.D. in Engineering . My aunt is a doctor. My grandparents were highly educatedRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy of Education958 Words   |  4 PagesMy Personal Philosophy of Education It is customary that on New Year’s Eve, we make New Year resolution. The fact is that we are making a set of guideline that we want to live by. These are motives that we seek to achieve. In a similar way, teachers live by philosophy. This essay focuses on my personal philosophy of education. It unfolds the function of philosophy in a teacher’s life, my view on the purpose of education, the student teacher- relationship and the philosophy which influences myRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy : My Philosophy Of Education1844 Words   |  8 PagesMy philosophy of education is romanticism. According to Ryan, Cooper, and Bolick, romanticism can be defined as â€Å"a child-centered philosophy of education that condemns the influences of society and suggests that a child’s natural curiosity and the natural world should be used to teach.† I am a believer in â€Å"gaining knowledge through sensory experiences and interactions with your peers† (Ryan, Cooper, a nd Bolick, 2016). I agree with this philosophy because it says that the needs of the student areRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy Of Education1443 Words   |  6 PagesThese beliefs of education are known as the philosophy of education. The philosophy of education is defined as the influences of what is taught and how the students will be taught. Throughout my study in my education class and past experiences, my mind was expanded and I acquired sufficient knowledge to develop my own concept of my personal philosophy of education. First, I will clarify the reasons why I choose the profession of being an educator. The first reason has been my parents influenceRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy Of Education966 Words   |  4 Pages Personal Philosophy of Education Allyson C. Taylor EDUC 542 Dr. M. Derrick Regent University The definition of curriculum can be as mysterious as the curriculum itself. Oliva (2013) described the hunt for the curriculum as being similar to â€Å"efforts to track down Bigfoot, the Bear Lake Monster, [and] the Florida Everglades Skunk Ape †¦Ã¢â‚¬  (pg. 2). All of these elusive beings have left tracks, yet there isn’t a single photograph to prove their existence—just likeRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy Of Education1335 Words   |  6 Pagesteaching style in the â€Å"Finding Your Philosophy of Education Quiz.† While I enjoyed learning about the different philosophies and psychological influences of teaching, I prefer constructivism, social reconstruction, and progressivism due to their student-centered learning, hands-on or project based learning style, while making efforts to improve the world around them. I will be discussing why I chose progressivism, social reconstruction, and constructivism as my preferences, as well as the role ofRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy Of Education873 Words   |  4 Pagesis a meaningful education? Throughout time many philosopher and educators have pondered on this question, leading to the development of theories and concepts that are present in the classroom today. In my personal experience, an educator philosophy is built over a course of time which is based on their knowledge and experience. An educator belief system is like a river, it changes and matures throughout its course, bending and changing as it progresses. Throughout the course of my educational careerRead MoreMy Personal Philosophy Of Education1152 Words   |  5 PagesIntroduction My personal philosophy of education relies on the fundamental belief that every individual has inherent value, therefore designating education as an environment where students may grow in their self-worth through academic and relational support. Thus, the purpose of education is to provide individuals with the opportunity to learn about both content and about self, growing in their identity. Within this personal philosophy of education, I will further detail the aim of education, the role